Wedel Mleczna

Posted by in Chocolate Reviews on November 20 2008 | Leave A Comment

One of the perks of this “job” is that we often get sent samples to review. Usually it’s the chocolate companies or chocolatiers that send us the chocolate. Occasionally a shop will send us some of the chocs they stock. It’s quite rare that we get sent chocolate by our readers, but that’s exactly what Malgorzata Sychta did.

So this is the first of two reviews of bars from her native Poland that she wanted us to try.

Now Simon reviewed a Wedel bar back in January and found it overly sweet. But my tastes are different and this time we have a solid block of milk chocolate – so how does it shape up?

Well despite the somewhat distressed state the bar arrived in, I really quite enjoyed it.

As far as I can tell, “Mleczna” simply means “Milky”, and that describes this bar quite well. It reminds me of the milk chocolate that you find in Kinder (not the white chocolate). It’s sweet with a distinctive, light, milkiness that’s quite different to the creamy flavour you get with something like Galaxy.

Simon likened the cherry bar he tried to Cadbury Dairy Milk, which is perhaps not entirely surprising, given that Cadbury own Wedel, but personally I much preferred this to Dairy Milk.

I genuinely enjoyed this bar and found myself scoffing chunk after chunk without even noticing, which, given how much expensive chocolate I have in the house right now, is quite a feat.

So if you happen to be passing your local Polish shop (or… er… Poland), I’d recommend picking up a bar and giving it a go.

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Comments On This Post

  1. ShephardReborn

    I’ve seen you’re quite fond of Polish sweets, which makes me happy and strangely proud. But apparently we Polish people are prone to that, anyways – try some other Wedel’s products: “Pawełek” (trans. Little Paul) is my favorite, especially the one with cream filling (called śmietankowy). Another product I would recommend is “Ptasie mleczko” (trans. Bird’s milk) an original creation with history even longer than the famous “Prince Polo” from Olza.