Arnott’s Tim Tam Crush Double Choc Crunch

Posted by in Chocolate Reviews on May 11 2010 | Leave A Comment
Arnott's Tim Tam Crush Double Choc Crunch

Both Kath and I have written before about the venerable Tim Tam, and the assortment of fiddles, fixes, and changes that Arnott’s have made over the years to their winning formula.

Amongst the stable of Tim and his cousins, the Honeycomb Crush was really a bit too sweet for my liking. That said, I do rather like the Sweet Surrender Crème Caramel, which really is a bit of a sugar bomb, but it seems to work quite well.

The “Crush” versions of Tim Tam are all the same in one respect – instead of 2 biscuity layers of crunchy yumness, we only get one. This is a little disappointing in some ways, because the Tim Tam is characterised by the soft filling and the crunchy biscuit (and of course the chocolate outside). The crush is also sweeter than your normal run-of-the-mill Tim.

Today’s race is being contested by “Tim Tam Crush Double Choc Crunch”. With a name that long, I feel all worn out and might need to lie down for 15 minutes. Perhaps I’ll eat one of these here Tim chaps and see if that gives me the energy to keep going. The total sugars content is over 50%, and it shows.

Double Choc Crunch seems to imply that we have some kind of extra chocolate – perhaps chocolate chip or chunks or something embedded in the soft chocolatey-moussey-stuff, although the pack is far from clear about what we should expect apart from the picture on the front. Nevertheless, my expectations were fairly high that we’d get some variety of texture here.

Arnott's Tim Tam Crush Double Choc Crunch

As you can see from the photo, though, breaking one in half does not exactly reveal the moussey layer to be swimming in choc chips. In fact, I couldn’t spot any. Nibbling my way carefully around to try and find one didn’t do much good either. The lumps might be there but they just disappear. Texture and crunch? No. The only crunch comes from the biscuit layer.

I’m disappointed. Just out of the starters gate and we have problems: less biscuit, a higher price, poorer texture, too sweet. The race is barely begun, but I can’t say I’ll be buying any more – this is too far from the winning formula.

Good thing I’m not a betting man – paying more money for ½ a normal Tim Tam – why bother?

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Comments On This Post

  1. Awww the name made them sound so good. Too bad :(